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Atomic-Scale Study Of Complex Cobalt Oxide Using Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope

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Title: Atomic-Scale Study Of Complex Cobalt Oxide Using Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope
Author(s): Gulec, Ahmet
Advisor(s): Klie, Robert F.
Contributor(s): Öğüt, Serdar; Schroeder, Andreas w.; Nicholls, Alan W.; Takoudis, Christos G.
Department / Program: Physics
Graduate Major: Physics
Degree Granting Institution: University of Illinois at Chicago
Degree: PhD, Doctor of Philosophy
Genre: Doctoral
Subject(s): Cobalt Oxide Transmission electron Microscopy Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy electron energy loss magnetic circular dichroism
Abstract: Cobalt oxides offer a rich field for the formation of novel phases, including superconductors and exotic magnetic phases, involving a mixed valence state for cobalt and/or the presence of oxygen vacancies. Having spin states, such as, low spin (LS), high spin (HS), and intermediate spin (IS), cobalt oxides differ from other 3d metal oxides The presence of such spin states make the physics of the cobalt oxides so complicated that it has not yet been completely understood. In order to improve our understanding of the various phase transitions observed in Cobalt oxides and to comprehend the relationship between crystal and electronic structure, both high energy resolution and high spatial resolution are essential. Fortunately, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a technique which is capable of fulfilling both of these requirements. In this thesis, I have utilized unique techniques in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) to analyze the atomic-scale structure-property relationship, both at room temperature and through insitu cooling to liquid nitrogen (LN2) temperature. In particular, by using correlated Z-contrast imaging, electron energy loss spectrum (EELS) and electron energy loss magnetic circular dichroism (EMCD), the structure, composition, bonding and magnetic behavior are characterized directly on the atomic scale.
Issue Date: 2015-07-21
Genre: thesis
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10027/19589
Rights Information: Copyright 2015 Ahmet Gulec
Date Available in INDIGO: 2017-07-22
Date Deposited: 2015-05
 

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